Katelyn Holub

blogging about music, art, and creativity


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Are You Satisfied With Your Approach to Composition?

Have you ever heard the riddle about a man, his boxes, and the bridge? A man had three boxes. Each box weighed 5 lbs. The man weighed 190 lbs. The bridge could only support 200 lbs. How did the man make it across the bridge with all his boxes?

*Photo Credit: Tom Thai, Creative Commons

*Photo Credit: Tom Thai, Creative Commons

This is from a scene in one of my all-time favorite television shows—Joan of Arcadia {a show about a high school girl who talks with God and learns from the various “assignments” God gives her}. In this particular episode, Joan learns that the only way the man can get across the bridge is by juggling the boxes.  Life is full of all kinds of juggling acts:

people carrying more weight than they alone can bear;

the delicate proportion of predators and prey in an ecosystem;

the forward motion of a planet offset by the pull of gravity on it by another planet.

This past week I had the pleasure of attending a talk about the art of composing by Augusta Read Thomas, a professor of composition at the University of Chicago and former Mead Composer-in-Residence with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra from 1996 to 2007. In hearing her speak, I noticed a theme to her approach to composition:

making art is all about juggling.

Just as our lives and nature balance several inter-connected variables, music is full of distinct parts that are balanced by the composer: flux, harmony, rhythm, flow, density, resonance, counterpoint, ornamentation, spontaneity, form, etc.

*Photo Credit: Jesus Solana, Creative Commons

*Photo Credit: Jesus Solana, Creative Commons

Depending on the purpose of the art, the balance amongst the musical variables will differ. For example, Thomas meticulously plans and revises her compositions, focusing often on the balance between nuance and spontaneity. A unique quality of her work is what she calls a “captured improvisational” sound that she creates through writing highly notated music. She strives to create “the feeling that [her music] is organically being self-propelled.” Listen to Thomas’ “Double Helix” for two violins for an example of her captured improvisation style.

The next time you sit down to compose, write, or sculpt, consider what you are juggling. How well are you balancing your art-form’s variables? Are all the parts working together to form a cohesive work of art? Taking the time to recognize your work’s unique balancing schema will help ensure your art meets your aims.

Have you struggled with balancing different variables in creating your art? What kinds of practices have helped you in your compositional process?

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